Current Weather for Hometown, IL

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Current Conditions    
Astronomy:
  Sunrise: 6:09 am
  Sunset: 7:35 pm
  Moon: Waning Crescent

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Current U.S. National Radar--Current

The Current National Weather Radar is shown below with a UTC Time (subtract 5 hours from UTC to get Eastern Time).

Current U.S. National Radar

National Weather Forecast--Current

The Current National Weather Forecast and National Weather Map are shown below.

Today's National Weather Map

National Weather Forecast for Tomorrow

Tomorrow National Weather Forecast and Tomorrow National Weather Map are show below.

Tomorrows National Weather Map

North America Water Vapor (Moisture)

This map shows recent moisture content over North America. Bright and colored areas show high moisture (ie, clouds); brown indicates very little moisture present; black indicates no moisture.

North American Water Vapor Map

Weather Topic: What is Hail?

Home - Education - Precipitation - Hail

Hail Next Topic: Hole Punch Clouds

Hail is a form of precipitation which is recognized by large solid balls or clumps of ice. Hail is created by thunderstorm clouds with strong updrafts of wind. As the hailstones remain in the updraft, ice is deposited onto them until their weight becomes heavy enough for them to fall to the earth's surface.

Hail storms can cause significant damage to crops, aircrafts, and man-made structures, despite the fact that the duration is usually less than ten minutes.

Next Topic: Hole Punch Clouds

Weather Topic: What are Mammatus Clouds?

Home - Education - Cloud Types - Mammatus Clouds

Mammatus Clouds Next Topic: Nimbostratus Clouds

A mammatus cloud is a cloud with a unique feature which resembles a web of pouches hanging along the base of the cloud.

In the United States, mammatus clouds tend to form in the warmer months, commonly in the Midwest and eastern regions.

While they usually form at the bottom of a cumulonimbis cloud, they can also form under altostratus, altocumulus, stratocumulus, and cirrus clouds. Mammatus clouds warn that severe weather is close.

Next Topic: Nimbostratus Clouds